Covid 2020 Tales (v) : Good Friday Bad Friday

SO my midweek post became a Good Friday post.  Sorry about that.

My heart feels heavy today and my body and mind are quite tired. But I’m not complaining. It’s a blessing to be able to stay at home, have food to eat and free independent ability to breathe.

(As someone who’s had pneumonia in the recent past, believe me, it’s a blessing to able to breathe freely and still remain free of the ruddy virus now sweeping even into rural Northern Ireland).

But if I’m honest I’m definitely very, very tired of now seemingly endless horrific death tolls and extremely sad at the daily worsening bad, bad death tolls in the UK.  Even if some of the death certificates have been manipulated. (That’s a story or article for another day).

It’s still surreal and hard to even comprehend what’s going on in our countries and our world still, or is that just me?

But today I think I just caught another depth of revelation on Good Friday, this day in which Christians all over the world remember the death of Jesus Christ, our Lord and Saviour.

Today the blood he shed for us – for me – I think has just become even more real and meaningful.

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The very first Easter, ( and the first Passover 1500 years prior) took place with people sheltering. The latter in obedience and the former in fear.

We are familiar with the part when Jesus emerges and it changes everything.

But are we really that sure about why Jesus’ gruesome, horrific death really matters so much or demands our notable interest and attention?

The blood is the reason why. Jesus completed his earthly mission when he he stated, “it is finished.’ Soon after, his blood was flowing down his battered, ripped body, and this blood released new power. He represented the innocent lamb sacrificed under the old covenant Passover.

And with it, new hope, in a mysterious way:

His blood cleanses us.

His blood heals us.

The blood protects us (even to this day, from deadly pandemic viruses).

But we need to know the power of this, and invoke this power and protection by doing in rememberance what Jesus told us to do – taking the bread and the wine in rembrance of him, and what He has done for all people, by his death on the cross.

It’s actually amazing when we grasp it.  Ask God to reveal it further.

The Church needs a fresh understanding – a fresh revelation – of the blood.

Especially in invoking its significance for protection during a pandemic.

This makes a bad Friday (like today in the UK) able to be Good again. Good Friday is full of light amidst darkness, and eternal hope every bit as much as Easter Sunday. We don’t have to wait until resurrection day for a glimmer of something positive.

I’ll leave you to ponder those latter two statements afresh for yourself.

Don’t take my word for it, check it out in the GOOD book, for what’s left of Good Friday.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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